The Foundation and Practical Application of Risk, Need, and Responsivity in the Age of COVID-19 and Justice Reform

 

National Institute of Corrections logoRisk and need (RNR) assessments have been administered in the criminal justice system for decades but often have not influenced professional decision-making in intended ways. Although these assessments should improve outcomes by matching individuals to indicated services, information derived from these tools has often been ignored or has been connected to increased incarceration rates and unfair racial and ethnic disparities. For example, people classified as high risk may be more likely to be detained pretrial or to receive a jail or prison sentence, when almost no tools have been developed or validated for this purpose. Most commonly used tools were created to set community-based conditions of treatment and supervision in lieu of detention. Especially in the light of the COVID-19 pandemic and discussions around criminal justice reform, practitioners and policy makers must understand what RNR is and how it should be applied correctly to enhance both public health and public safety. This webinar seeks to define the core principles and practical application of Risk-Need-Responsivity along with strategies to create and maintain critical collaborative relationships to achieve reentry goals.

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Learning Objectives: During this 90-minute interactive webinar, participants will:

  • Understand how common fallacies and misunderstandings about RNR principles have contributed to unnecessary reliance on incarceration and links to racial and ethnic disparities
  • Learn how proper use of RNR can reduce disparities, enhance criminal justice outcomes, and contribute to effective and equitable justice reform
  • Experience a practical application of the principles in a case study of reintegrating individuals within Multnomah County, Oregon
  • Learn strategies to create and maintain collaborative relationships to achieve your jurisdiction’s reentry goals

Panelists:

Who Should Attend? 
Any employee of a federal, state, or local correctional jurisdiction routinely involved in direct interaction with offenders as part of their title or function.

Who Do I Contact for More Information? 
Content and Technical Contact
Gregory Crawford, Correctional Program Specialist, Community Services Division, National Institute of Corrections
Email: gcrawford@bop.gov