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Connecticut

Adult Criminal Record Clearance Overview

Adult criminal records for cases in which you were conviction are eligible for destruction or vacating.   

  • In Connecticut, if you are granted an absolute pardon, your record will be erased by the court. 
  • If you were convicted of an offense that is decriminalized, the record can be destroyed by the court. You must file a petition in court to start the process, and the judge must grant your petition if you meet the criteria. 
  • If you were convicted of prostitution because you were a victim of human trafficking, the record can be vacated by the court. You must file a petition in court to start the process and it is up to the judge whether to grant your petition. 
  • If you were convicted of possession of marijuana, your record will be erased by the court. 
  • If you were convicted of possession with intent to use drug paraphernalia to store, contain or conceal, or to ingest, inhale or otherwise introduce into the human body, marijuana, your record will be erased by the court. 
  • If you were convicted of manufacturing, distributing, selling, prescribing, compounding, transporting with the intent to sell or dispense, possessing with the intent to sell or dispense, offering, giving, or administering to another person a marijuana-type substance and involving less than or equal to four ounces or six plants grown inside such person’s own primary residence for personal use, your record will be erased by the court. 
  • Police, court, and state's attorney records pertaining to certain misdemeanor convictions will be erased. 
  • Police, court, and state's attorney records pertaining to a class D or E felony or an unclassified felony carrying a term of imprisonment of not more than five years will be erased. 

Adult criminal records for certain deferred adjudication programs may be eligible for automatic erasure once you complete your program. 

Adult criminal records for arrests for which you were never convicted are eligible to be returned. In most situations, the record will be returned to you automatically.   

  • If you were arrested but found not guilty or your case was dismissed, the record is returned by the State Police Bureau of Identification if you have no prior convictions. The police, court, and state attorney records will be erased. 
  • If your case ended with a nolle prosequi, the record is returned by the State Police Bureau of Identification if you have no prior convictions. The police, court, and state attorney records should be erased automatically, and you can file a petition to start the process. 

Adult Criminal Record Clearance Policies

    Records relating to possession of marijuana will be erased by the court. Conn. Gen. Stat. § 54-142v(a).
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    Records relating to possession with intent to use drug paraphernalia to store, contain or conceal, or to ingest, inhale or otherwise introduce into the human body, marijuana, will be erased by the court. Conn. Gen. Stat. § 54-142v(a).
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    Records relating to manufacturing, distributing, selling, prescribing, compounding, transporting with the intent to sell or dispense, possessing with the intent to sell or dispense, offering, giving, or administering to another person a marijuana-type substance and involving less than or equal to four ounces or six plants grown inside such person's own primary residence for personal use, may be erased by the court. Conn. Gen. Stat. § 54-142v(a).
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    Police, court, and state's attorney records pertaining to certain misdemeanor convictions will be erased. Conn. Gen. Stat. § 54-142a(e)(1)
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    The records relating to police, court, and state's attorney records pertaining to a class D or E felony or an unclassified felony carrying a term of imprisonment of not more than five years will be erased by the court after 10 years. Conn. Gen. Stat. § 54-142a(e)(1).
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    Records relating to an offense that has since been decriminalized can be ordered destroyed by a court at any time. Conn. Gen. Stat. § 54-142d.
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    Records relating to a conviction for prostitution pursuant to section 53a-82 that occurred as a result of the petitioner having been a victim of human trafficking can be vacated by the court. Conn. Gen. Stat. § 54-95c.
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    Records relating to an offense for which an absolute pardon has been granted are erased. Conn. Gen. Stat. § 54-142a(d)(2).
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    Records relating to offenses dismissed after the completion of certain deferred adjudication programs are erased upon dismissal. Conn. Gen. Stat. §§ 54-56e, 46-38c(h), 29-33(h), 54-142a.
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    Police, court, and state's attorney records relating to a case for which a nolle prosequi was entered are erased within 13 months. Conn. Gen. Stat. § 54-142a(c).
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    Records relating to a finding of not guilty or a dismissal of charges are returned by the State Police Bureau of Identification, copies are destroyed, and electronic images are deleted, so long as the person has no prior criminal convictions. Conn. Gen. Stat. § 29-15(a).
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    Records relating to a case for which a nolle prosequi was entered are returned by the State Bureau of Identification within 60 days after 13 months, so long as the person has no prior criminal convictions. Conn. Gen. Stat. § 29-15(a)(1).
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    Police, court, and state attorney records relating to a finding of not guilty or a dismissal are erased upon affirmance after appeal or when the time to appeal has expired. Conn. Gen. Stat. § 54-142a(a)(b).
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    Juvenile Record Clearance Overview

    Below is a general overview of when juvenile records can be erased in Connecticut. Please note that the Clean Slate Clearinghouse does not provide legal advice.  

    Read the legal policies and statutes for detailed statutory information.    

    Juvenile Record Clearance Policies Overview 

    Most juvenile records can be erased.   

     

     

    • Non-serious juvenile charges can be erased after you turn 18 and at least two years have passed since your discharge. You must submit a request to the court to start the process, and the judge is required to grant your request if you meet the criteria. 
    • Serious juvenile charges can be erased after you turn 18 and at least four years have passed since your discharge. You must submit a request to the court to start the process, and the judge is required to grant your request if you meet the criteria. 
    • If you can show the court you have a good reason to have your record erased, you can submit a request to the court to erase your record before the two- or four-year waiting period is over. It is up to the judge whether to grant your request. 
    • Certain records can be erased at any time if you were a victim of human trafficking. You must submit a request to the court to start the process, and it is up to the judge whether to grant your request. 

    If you have certain convictions or adjudications on your record, you may not be eligible to have your record erased.    

    Find a Lawyer 

    If you think you might be eligible to have your record erased, find a lawyer who may be able to help you. Some lawyers might help you for free, although you may still need to pay a fee to file the paperwork in court.    

    Court Forms and Resources 

    If you cannot find a lawyer to help you, you may be able to file a petition on your own using these court forms and resources. 

     

     

     

     

    Juvenile Record Clearance Policies

      Records relating to a delinquency matter can be erased by the court upon a showing of good cause. Conn. Gen. Stat. § 46b-146.
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      Records relating to a child who has a criminal record as a result of being a victim of human trafficking will be erased upon petition. Conn. Gen. Stat. § 46b-146.
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      Records relating to a person whose case was dismissed as not delinquent will be erased immediately without the filing of a petition. Conn. Gen. Stat. § 46b-146.
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      Records relating to an adjudication for a nonserious juvenile offense will be erased upon petition so long as the person is at least 18 years of age, at least two years have elapsed from the date of discharge, and the person is not subject to a disqualifying event. Conn. Gen. Stat. § 46b-146.
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      Records relating to an adjudication for a serious juvenile offense will be erased upon petition so long as the person is at least 18 years of age, at least four years have elapsed from the date of discharge, and the person is not subject to a disqualifying event. Conn. Gen. Stat. § 46b-146.
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      Find A Lawyer

      Legal service providers located in the state.

      Contact information for legal aid organizations, bar associations, and other organizations that engage in record clearance work is provided for informational purposes only. The NRRC does not endorse or recommend any organization or individual referenced on the site. If you are a legal service provider who offers record clearance services, please contact us.